Our History

Timeline

2002

The GOSL and the LTTE enter Cease-fire Agreement

FLICT conceptualized and born in the euphoric aftermath of the signing of the Cease Fire Agreement in Feb 2002.Designed on the premise that a sustainable peace process needs the active involvement of civil society organizations (CSOs) alongside the main conflict parties.

2003

Since its inception in 2003 FLICT worked in 3 focus areas:

  • Transforming cultural identities towards an inclusive society
  • Inter-ethnic and inter-religious linkages for conflict transformation
  • Civic participation for democratic and plural forms of governance
2004

Indian Ocean Tsunami

With the Tsunami, partners and communities at grass root level were adversely affected by both disaster and the consequent flood of financial aid which followed.

Challenge: Being perceived by civil society as a potential fund rather than a project with a primary focus on capacity development.

2005

Political Change Ushered in with presidential electionsHostile to the peace process

Space for negotiation shrinks visibly. Escalation of violence, media suppression and stringent regulations restricting civil society action becomes the norm in new context. with several bomb blasts across the country.

The suspension of negotiations was not conducive to an organization engaging in conflict transformation work.

Challenges:
Reluctance of donors to continue funding conflict transformation initiatives within such unfavorable conditions. Partners' roles, needs and expectations also fluctuated making it difficult to work within a set agenda over a long period of time.

Strategy: Through constant assessment of the changing context, FLICT adapted its’ approach and further strengthened its impact and outreach through innovative strategies

  • Strong emphasis on conceptual work, knowledge generation & training of trainers
  • Regional Approach
  • Identifying new points of entry
  • Creation of spaces for dialogue through art, culture and media.
2006

The trainee handbook on CCPI was developed and the diploma was launched. At the end of 3 cycles of training the 37 certified coaches are available in 10 districts of the country.

Coaching for Conflict Transformation & Peace building Initiatives (CCPI) which aimed to identify, train and certify a pool of consultants from all parts of the country who could coach other regionally based organizations was one of the strong programmatic achievements to come out of this concerted effort of knowledge generation.

2007

Transformation through arts and culture grows in scope, proving to be one of FLICTs strongest programmatic areas .By 2007, demand from local artists, cultural activists , arts teachers and women in the arts is growing so fast that FLICT is investing 52% of its resources to support the work of these creative partners committed to social justice. With the experience gained over the years, the cultural work became a part of FLICT’s unique identity, distinguishing FLICT from the array of good governance and conflict resolution projects being implemented.

2008

Abrogation of Ceasefire Agreement

Space for negotiation shrinks visibly. Escalation of violence, media suppression and stringent regulations restricting civil society action becomes the norm in new context. with several bomb blasts across the country.

2009

War ends after an intensive military offensive

2010

Ministry of National Languages and Social Integration established

Based on previous experience and lessons learnt, FLICT took on a regional approach in 2009/2010, with a greater emphasis on understanding and working on local level conflict issues. This concerted regional approach with emphasis given to 5 pilot districts (Ampara, Mullativu, Badulla, Galle and Puttalam) – from different parts of the island and each with a uniquely different SI situation - contributed towards increased effectiveness of overall

2011

FLICT steps forward to address a range of issues related to social integration and reconciliation. Partner-base broadens from civil society to also include State and private sector Geographic-base expanded with programme staff forging links with districts beyond their base.

Based on previous experience and lessons learnt, FLICT took on a regional approach in 2009/2010, with a greater emphasis on understanding and working on local level conflict issues. This concerted regional approach with emphasis given to 5 pilot districts (Ampara, Mullativu, Badulla, Galle and Puttalam) – from different parts of the island and each with a uniquely different SI situation - contributed towards increased effectiveness of overall

2012

GIZ-FLICT supports formulation of first ever National Policy for Social Integration in Sri Lanka - by Ministry of National Languages and Social Integration

2013

Geographical scope of FLICT further widens. Each of the 5 programme officers starts liaising with a cluster of surrounding districts in addition to the district originally assigned to him or her.

P.O.s act as peers and coaches to cadre of National Integration Promotion Assistants and Coordinators posted island-wide. FLICT hopes that through supporting and strengthening the network of NIPAs and NIPCs, the partner ministry will be allowed to gradually upscale this work to cover all 25 Districts.

2014

Cultural Transformation for Social Integration and Reconciliation is launched –A new and ambitious project co-funded by EU and BMZ Implemented in partnership with the University of Colombo,Sri Lanka Foundation and Janakaraliya.

FLICT takes special pride in recognizing ‘Janakaraliya’ inter-ethnic, mobile theatre group; a beneficiary of FLICT when it was first formed; now collaborating as an implementing partner on this project.

2015

Trilingual Dictionary wins merit award at annual contest recognizing best Sri Lankan websites . The first web based interactive dictionary in Sinhala, Tamil & English is an initiative by the Department of Official Languages developed with support of FLICT http://www.trilingualdictionary.lk/

GIZ-FLICT provides technical and financial support to the Ministry of Public Administration, Provincial Councils, Local Government and Democratic Governance in operationalizing and implementing the recommendations encapsulated in the policy through facilitating collaboration between state, private sector and civil society.